Conditional Sentence

‘Cause there will be no sunlight if I lose you. My eyes will do the same if you walk away. Everyday, it will rain If I was in their shoes, I would be doing the same thing. I pick up these broken pieces ’til I’m bleeding if that will make you mine. Conditional sentence is a sentence grammarly that is used to express a wish, hope, supposition, or plan that may or may not be realized. The general formula for a conditional sentence is: consequence + if + condition From the formula, we can see that a conditional sentence has two clauses, the first is a clause with an “if”… Read More

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Modal #2

Tell me your problems, I will chase them away. I could see the sky, Sky beautiful tonight. When you need to talk it out with someone you can trust. I would stay there, There‚Äôs no need to fear. The bolded words in English grammar is called Modal. Modal is a verb that combines with another verb to indicate mood or tense. Modals include modal verbs, semi-modal verbs (also called marginal modals) and other modal expressions ( similar modal). They combine with main verbs and modify their meanings. A modal may have several different meanings, while similar meanings may be expressed by using different modals. The easy form of modal must… Read More

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English Proficiency Test

Language proficiency is difficult to measure, as everyone has different strengths, weaknesses, and learning styles. You may be able to tell the difference between a person who only speaks a few words in English and a native English speaker, but what about everyone in between? How can you determine your English level? And how many English proficiency levels are there? Generally, The CEFR, Common European Framework of Reference for Languages, is one of many frameworks that describe your language proficiency. This standard includes 6 distinct English levels: A1, A2, B1, B2, C1, and C2. Some institutions also recognize the pre-A1 level, though it is not as common. There are several… Read More

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Reductions

When natives speak, they reduce the pronunciation of certain words and phrases. This can be confusing for non-native speakers who are often unfamiliar with these reductions. Learning some common English reductions will improve your comprehension and make you sound more natural to native speakers. English reductions are usually not taught in English language schools but you need to know reductions in order to understand conversations between native English speakers. Reductions are used extensively in TV, movies, music, literature, and in conversations among native English speakers. Here are some common reductions: Whassup: what is up Gimme: give me Lemme: let me Gonna: going to Gotta: got to Wanna: want to Dunno:… Read More

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Training the brain by reading

Reading: Training The Brain We regularly obsess over the best ways to exercise our bodies: how to trim them or strengthen them, what to feed them or what to keep away from them. But how often do we think about exercising our brains? The most complex organ and command center of the whole body, the small, internal three-pound biological structure is responsible for so many important functions, yet it tends to get ignored, even taken for granted. From relieving stress to improving brain function to increasing empathy, books are capable of doing a lot more than just entertaining the people who enjoy them. In fact, reading is the best workout… Read More

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